Monthly Archives: December 2012

New Year’s Eve Wedding

I’m going to a New Year’s Eve Eve wedding this Sunday! I’m so excited to see Jordan and Alison get married in Chicago as the perfect ending to a pretty great year. Do you know anyone getting married this weekend? Their wedding isn’t quite New Year’s Eve, but it’s close enough that the festive vibe will be ringing loud and clear as it’s hours away from being the last wedding of 2012.

Must-have photos? A celebratory kiss, of course! And there’s also something fun and classy about the details that go into a NYE wedding. Lots of black and white, crisp textures, sparkly accessories, and bright accents of confetti or bling. Those who are simple or more muted in their design preferences need not apply to have a New Year’s Eve wedding. A celebration that starts in one year and ends in the next is anything but boring!

So whether you’ll be celebrating a new year and a new marriage this year or planning for one next year, indulge in some New Year’s Eve wedding photos!

Studio Starling

Studio Starling

Braden Harris

Braden Harris

Ryan Estes Photography

Ryan Estes Photography

Natalie Williams Photography

Natalie Williams Photography

Miller + Miller

Miller + Miller

Lucy Dylan Weddings

Lucy Dylan Weddings

Jessica Claire

Jessica Claire

Colin Lyons Wedding Photography

Colin Lyons Wedding Photography

Grazier Photography

Grazier Photography

Winter Weddings Inspiration

No mater what you celebrate this time of year, it’s easy to fall in love with winter weddings. There’s something so romantic about exchanging vows in front of a backdrop of white winter.

Here are some of my favorite winter weddings images. They’re just snow good!

Ella Photography

Ella Photography

Amy Lashell Photography

Amy Lashell Photography

Tessa Perkins Photo

Tessa Perkins Photo

Clarke Walker Studios

Clarke Walker Studios

Melissa Diep Photography

Melissa Diep Photography

Peter Bang Photography

Peter Bang Photography

Think you’re stuck and out of luck for good ideas for winter weddings? Wrong! Snow plow your assumption and heat up your brain with this super cute idea: SNOW SKIS! CHUPPAH POLES! Is this not brilliant, or what?

Happy Winter, Everyone!

Tessa Perkins Photo

Tessa Perkins Photo

  • Judith Joseph says:

    I LOVE the skis as huppah poles!! What a great idea!

How Involved Should A Bride Be With Her Bridesmaids?

A few months ago, the post about the Maid of Honor’s role in the wedding party was a hit among Yentas readers and helped explain the duties for women waiting in the wings to fill those shoes.

The article talked about her MOH as the bride’s personal heroine of the wedding — the one who helps saves the day should anything go wrong or requires assistance. What the article did not touch on was a bride’s role in the wedding party as a whole, and how much of a role, if any — other than showing up, looking pretty, and saying “I do” — she should have with the other gals.

The post received a comment that is worth addressing for all to read as it is something I wondered as well when I was a bride.

The comment from Bride-to-Be:

This is quite a job! Why do I feel such guilt about putting so much work on a friend’s shoulders? How much involvement should a bride have with the bridesmaids beyond choosing them?

Thanks, Bride-to-Be, for your question and sharing your thoughts with the rest of the Yentas.

It’s not easy to be waited on, hand and foot, without any guilt. Even if it’s someone’s job — as it is the MOH’s — it’s difficult to accept such generosity and good intentions.

I say, accept it with grace! This is an appropriate time to count on your best girlfriends, especially your MOH, for anything. The day only happens once and the months and events leading up to it are a snapshot in time. The year-ish of wedding planning is not forever so the generosity and good intentions are really, actually, short lived.

Also, a bride picks these special women not because they’re pretty and make great arm candy to the wedding scene. Okay, maybe that, too! But, really, a bride picks these special women because she knows she can count on them, she has a history of happy memories with them, and considers them to have long term presence in her life. If they were fleeting friends or unreliable women, a bride would — hopefully — not have picked them. Most likely, each friend serves a purpose. Maybe there’s the quiet listener who will provide the platform you need to share your ideas and feelings. Maybe there’s the funny one who will distract you when you’re stressed. Maybe there’s the crafty one who will help you sort out your creative ideas. Maybe there’s the knowledgeable one who’s been a bride before or has an inside understanding of weddings.

The Maid of Honor is the one you can count on, no matter what. And of course she doesn’t mind doing her job. In fact, it’s an honor. It’s in her title, after all.

So how much involvement should the bride have with her bridesmaids other than choosing them? Well, that depends on the type of wedding, girlfriends, and bride. Generally, I would say that the bride can give input to her MOH who is the Commander in Chief. For example, if a bride wants to make sure that her bachelorette party is not a chippendale’s fling fest and would prefer a tame and more G-rated spa day, then that would be a good reason for the bride to get involved. Should she plan the whole spa day down to the last cucumber water and hot stone? No, no! It’s okay to hint at what she wants, but it’s not okay for her to take charge and plan everything herself. Otherwise, what’s the point of having the support system?

When it comes to bridesmaid wardrobe or dates for events, the bride can again assume that her MOH will liaise with the rest of the party. The bride can tell the MOH the information about which shoes to purchase or the hair stylist’s rates, but she can just as quickly tell the MOH the information and then forget about it because her trusted confidant and partner in wedding crime will deliver the messages to the other gals so the bride can focus on her other lists, decisions, and ideas.

The bride can be involved, however, to show gratitude and appreciation. Thanking them through emails and words on the day of the wedding will always be welcomed. The positive experience that the bride creates for her bridesmaids will provide a positive experience for everyone.

So, brides, do not feel like you need to be busy with bridesmaid business. You chose these girls because you can count on them. Therefore, count your blessings on the way to the chuppah and they’ll be there to greet you with smiles and love.

{Real Jewish Weddings} Waltham, MA

A summer wedding in Massachusetts with close friends and family coming together to celebrate a wonderful couple? Sounds like we have a winner for today’s Real Jewish Wedding! Cori and Max tied the knot at Gore Place, which was built in 1806 and served as a summer home for two of George Washington’s personal friends. While the Gores entertained such notable dignitaries as Daniel Webster and James Monroe during early 19th century, Cori and Max entertained equally notable (to them) wedding guests surrounded by harvest blooms and warm Jewish traditions.

Mazel tov, Cori and Max!

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

massachusetts-jewish-weddings

Photographer: Brett Alison Photography
Event Venue: Gore Place
Caterer: Choice Catering
Dress Store: Madeleine’s Daughter Bridal Salon
Cake Designer: The Icing on the Cake
Band: In the House Band

Editorial Partner: Two Bright Lights

Jewish Weddings 101 For Groomsmen

The Wedding Yentas are happy to have Brian Becker guest-blog today! Brian, who is not Jewish and more of a practicing Nothingish, has been the Best Man in a Jewish wedding and brings his expert opinion to the Yentas family of readers. Here he explains what every Jewish bride and groom should tell their non-Jewish wedding party.

I am not a Jewish Bride. I’m not even Jewish. But having been the Best Man, I do have an important piece of advice for anyone getting ready to tie the knot – a little list I like to call “Things to Tell Your Gentile Groomsmen.”

image-courtesy-of-eight20-photography

Look, men are already at a disadvantage because…well…we don’t know about weddings. And unlike bridesmaids who are let in on every little detail, for the most part, nobody tells us anything. So imagine how confusing it can be to be the goyim in the wedding party when the more traditional customs start to unfold. For example…

Yarmulkes. We’ve probably never worn one. In fact, I just had to look up how to spell it. On top of that, we’re expected to fasten it with another foreign piece of hardware: a bobby pin. In my case, the groomsmen did such an abysmal job that the bridesmaids had to do emergency readjustments just seconds before we escorted them down the aisle. So please, do everyone a favor and offer a little kippah 101 in advance.

image-courtesy-of-eight20-photography

Rings. As the Best Man, I was the nearest person with pockets at any given moment. That meant that I was constantly being handed more things to carry. In fact, I ended up carrying three ring boxes (one for the groom, one for the bride and one plain, unornamented ring for the bride to use during the ceremony). Add to that other last-minute cargo like vows and tissues, and the groomsmen can start to feel like we’re wearing saddle bags. Do your best to think through who will schlep around your wedding day accessories – and give that person a heads up!

The Hora. Think for a second what it must be like to witness a giant whirlpool form on the dance floor just moments before someone grabs your hand and pulls you into the vortex. Speaking for the “non-chosen people,” we do not see that one coming. What’s more, we’re expected to hoist the groom up on a chair and carry him around for several minutes. This is a great moment, and a lot of fun. Just make sure you prep your bridal party that some heavy lifting may be required.

image-courtesy-of-meghan-aileen-photography

The Ceremony. If you’re incorporating Jewish traditions into your wedding, it’s a nice idea to explain them in advance. Otherwise, while you’re circling your husband seven times, your groomsmen may be scratching their heads. If you fill the bridal party in on the significance of the customs featured in your ceremony, they’ll be able to share the moment with the rest of your guests, instead of wondering what’s going on.

Take it from a Jewish wedding survivor: A little orientation can go a long way. Make a point to share some your wedding customs with the gentile-men in your bridal party, and you’ll help ensure that every one is relaxed and happy on your special day. Good luck…and l’chaim!

brian-becker-best-man

Brian Becker is a freelance writer and editor, and most importantly, a Best Man extraordinaire. He lives in the Los Angeles area and enjoys a good Captain and Coke, an Aaron Sorkin flick, and a round of trivia.