Monthly Archives: October 2010

Friday Favorites | I Do by Kendra Scott

Happy Friday, Wedding Yentas fans. You know what we’re not a fan of? Hearing bridesmaids tell nightmare stories about brides who made them buy expensive dresses they could never wear again. You don’t want to be one of those brides, do you? And we’re sure some of you can relate to dishing out the cash for a frock you don’t give a frock about after your girlfriend’s wedding day. Well guess what? Jewelry doesn’t have to be that way. Jewelry has the power to be timeless and versatile and on this very Friday where we talk about one of our favorite things, we want to share a line of bling that will have you and your bridesmaids asking for more unbridal bridal jewelry. I Do by Kendra Scott is the “it” line that features a rainbow of colors that even makes a leprechaun green(er) with envy, and at the end of this rainbow is a pot of gold in the form of happy bridesmaids.

A common gift that a bride gives to her maids is something sparkly to wear on the wedding day. A pair of earrings, a special bracelet, a dangling necklace. So it’s likely that you’ll be doing the same: giving a little memento to remember your wedding day. But what’s the point of wanting your girls to remember your special oo-la-la day if the trinket is ugly or cheesy or cheap? Instead, they’ll forget it while it’s stuffed away in a drawer for the rest of its tarnished life. So, personalize it! Give it legs! Make your jewelry presents actually have a life after your kisses and cake-cutting.

With Kendra Scott’s bridal line, you have so many choices that you’ll be sure to find something special for each of your bridesmaids. Kendra Scott creates pieces that are modern and colorful, bringing you many options to match your wedding day’s color palette. Do you want to complement colors or match colors? Do you want to provide a piece that goes along with each maid’s favorite color? Do you want them to match your jewelry so you create a set that ties you and your girls together? Answer these questions for yourself and then start shopping!

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Think we’re full of hooey? How would this Kendra Scott girl simply know anything about what you’re going through as a stressed-out bride? Oh, trust us. She knows. Kendra was a recent bride and had such difficulty finding jewelry to wear on her wedding day that was exciting and out-of-the-box. If you’re not a “pearls” kind of girl and you don’t want to wear pieces that all look the same out of department store glass cases, just know that Kendra’s got your back and felt your pain, which is why she took it upon herself to create this bridal line. (Hmmm… we know a little something about creating something to fill a need that wasn’t met when planning a wedding something…. AHEM The Wedding Yentas dot com AHEM). So, as a bride on the jewelry-shopping frontlines, Kendra went to battle for you and now she’s provided a kingdom of brides a key to the jewelry castle.

Because it’s still October and we’re still really into raising breast cancer awareness (by the way, you can still leave a comment on last week’s Think Pink Wedding post so we can donate $1 for every comment we receive), we thought we’d showcase these pink pieces since pink is the official color of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. This hue, though, is one of many, many options you have for pink and other bold, chic colors you can choose to incorporate in your wedding day jewelry for yourself and your ladies. In fact, if you really want to get down and dirty with the broad color selections that Kendra Scott offers, you can play in The Color Bar so you can mix and match designs with colors. Control freak brides, prepare to be in heaven.

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So, consider Kendra Scott for your wedding jewelry gifts and you’ll have some pretty happy bridesmaids who, a year later, will wish you a happy anniversary… of the day you gave them a gem of a gift. Oh, and give yourself a gift, too. If you provide your email address to the Kendra Scott website, you’ll get an email coupon for $20 off a purchase! And since Kendra Scott jewelry is already a great value, you’re basically paying nothing for a really impressive piece. Saving and sparkling — yeah, we’re okay with that.

Real Weddings | Austin, TX

As the wedding day progressed, Cindy and Mario’s special day carried artistic and personal touches at every turn. If it wasn’t the custom yarmulkes that were handed out at the ketubah signing, then surely the chuppah would set the tone that this wedding was all about celebrating the these two individuals coming together as a couple. After all, the chuppah’s canopy was made from Cindy’s mother’s wedding veil and then adorned with flowers. One symbolic tradition became a new meaningful staple to their Jewish wedding.

Beware! Children participating in weddings can steal the bride and groom’s thunder if they’re super cute. Today’s wedding is no exception to this fair warning. The flower girls and ring bearers were the bride’s cute nieces and nephews and it was so cute and funny the way the two ring bearers diplomatically shared their duties! This is serious business after all!

Since this Cuban-Jewish couple just moved from Brooklyn to Texas, they knew there had to be salsa dancing as well as the Horah at their reception. Cindy and Mario’s guests weren’t shy on the dance floor thanks to the rockin’ tunes and restive decor. The whimsical displays of hydrangeas, succulents, and birds’ nests for the ceremony were the perfect prelude to the reception’s vintage motif that featured mason jars filled with posies and tulips. The escort cards were miniature pecan pies — yum! — that led their guests to their tables with turquoise framed old-fashioned alphabet cards. Proof is in the pudding that design elements have no bounds when it comes to personalizing your wedding. Cindy and Mario’s special day was a cornucopia of red and aqua details that provided a fun, chic, and retro atmosphere.

Mazel tov, Cindy and Mario!

Venue – Texas Old Town
Photographer/Photobooth – Katherine O’Brien Photography
Caterer – Word of Mouth
Floral Design – Rosehip Flora
Entertainment – Guateque
Rabbi – Steven Gross
Ketubah – TheKetubah.com – Stephanie Caplan

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  • shualah elisheva says:

    rabbi gross is pretty spectacular. love him!

  • Katherine says:

    Looks awesome- I loved all the red details- thanks so much for the feature!

Interfaith Ketubah Shopping 101

We’re happy to host another knowledgeable guest blogger, Mindy Parker, who represents MP Artworks, the online ketubah design store that has unique and artistic prints for all couples’ tastes and styles. Today, we focus on selecting a ketubah for interfaith weddings. If only one of you is Jewish, are there additional rules that must be listed on your ketubah? What if your partner doesn’t want a very religious ketubah but accepts your Jewish roots? What if you’re a non-Jewish bride who knows nothing about planning a Jewish wedding, but you want your partner and partner’s family to feel included by incorporating their Jewish traditions? Mindy has all the answers for you here, so read on and know you have options!

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Interfaith weddings can provide wonderful, yet challenging, opportunities to incorporate each other’s traditions into the celebration. Some things, such as the ketubah – one of the traditions (in fact, requirements) of a Jewish wedding – happens to translate very nicely to an interfaith setting. And because it’s often the one thing that you will hang on your wall and see day after day, long after you say “I do,” it’s well worth considering. So let me quickly demystify what an “interfaith ketubah” is and then tell you what to look for to get you started.

The first question is usually, “What exactly is an interfaith ketubah anyway?” This one is easy. There is no “standard” or “official” interfaith ketubah. There’s just no such thing. The term simply means a ketubah (or, traditionally, a Jewish marriage contract) in which the design and the text are geared toward an interfaith couple. These days there are plenty of options available for interfaith couples, so let me give you some quick pointers.

I’ll start with the “interfaith” design. As a Jewish tradition, you will find that many ketubahs have Jewish symbolism, which you may want to avoid. For example, many designs incorporate the Star of David or Jewish scripture. But worry not – there are many, many ketubahs that are simply beautiful works of art with no religious symbolism whatsoever. In fact, this is the fun part! Designs range from traditional to funky, simple to elaborate, impressionistic to pop art, in every color scheme possible. There are many designs that even incorporate other cultures’ symbolism or art, which is a great way to “represent” the non-Jewish party in this tradition. Remember, this is a work of art that you will probably be staring at for the next 50 (at least) years on your wall so you want to choose a design that you both truly love.

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Next, you will want to choose an “interfaith” text. The only “standard” ketubah text is the original Aramaic text, still used today with little change by the Orthodox and Conservative movements. Beyond that, most other texts are simply written by the ketubah artist who almost always offers one or more “interfaith” texts. They are not legal contracts but simply modern, egalitarian statements of your vows to each other. But you will find that an “interfaith” text will also exclude any religious or cultural language that could be offensive to the non-Jewish party, such as references to Moses, Sarah, Israel or such Jewish-oriented phrases as “home built on Torah” or “traditional Jewish spirit.” An interfaith ketubah text, like most ketubah texts in America, typically contains two portions: one in English and one in Hebrew. The Hebrew is a direct translation of the English and gives the Jewish party an opportunity to recognize their Jewish background. But if you prefer, you can choose to have an English-only ketubah, or you may want to write your own custom text to reflect exactly what’s important to you.

If a rabbi or cantor will be officiating at your ceremony, it is a good idea to have him or her approve the text. Although an interfaith ketubah is not a legal document according to Jewish law, some officiants still have strict policies about what kind of text they will (or will not) allow on an interfaith ketubah. Remember that all officiants are different, and since your officiant is the final authority on what is permitted at your wedding, you definitely want to know ahead of time if your text selection will be permitted.

Perhaps the most confusion comes when you need to personalize your interfaith text – i.e., provide the information to fill in the blanks with your names, dates, location, etc. But it’s actually quite simple. If the Jewish partner has a given Hebrew name, it is customary to use it on the ketubah, in conjunction with the parents’ Hebrew names. Then comes the tricky part. The single most often-asked interfaith ketubah text question: “My fiance is not Jewish; how do we handle the Hebrew names on that side?” There are two possible answers to this question: (1) You can omit the non-Jewish people from the text or, (2) My personal preference, allow the non-Jewish names to be transliterated. Relax, no one is getting a “Hebrew” name here. Instead, the names are simply spelled out, phonetically, in Hebrew characters (like spelling an Israeli name in English letters). This process ensures that all people within both texts have been included, resulting in a “balanced” ketubah.

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There may be some “extras” you might want depending on your circumstance and what your ketubah artist offers. For example, if the non-Jewish partner is Irish, you might want to add a third language and have your ketubah text in English, Hebrew and Gaelic. Or if you are having your ceremony performed jointly by a rabbi and a minister, you may want to alter the ketubah’s signature lines to add one for the minister. Be sure to talk to your ketubah artist or the shop where you get your ketubah to see what other options might be right for you.

That’s basically it! Choose your favorite design, select the text that works best for you, then personalize it. That’s all you need to do to have an interfaith ketubah that will incorporate the Jewish tradition yet serve as a beautiful memento of your special day.

Mindy K. Parker is the co-founder of Ketubah Studio by MP Artworks – “The Ketubah People.” She works on the business side of the company with fine artists exclusively represented by Ketubah Studio, and serves as inspiration for her co-founder husband, Micah, the principal artist and creative visionary. Together, they love working with couples of all ages, backgrounds and religions to provide them with unique designs that show off their style. When she’s not working, she’s likely covered in pet hair from their artistic cats (Monet, Matisse, Pollock and Seuss) and musical pit bull (Redbone) or other animals that she volunteers with at local shelters.

  • Robin says:

    What a great article and such beautiful ketubahs! I will for sure be looking at those for my upcoming wedding.

  • Naomi Freedman says:

    Mindy, Your Ketubahs are truly works of art. However, I actually have a question. My son is marrying a non Jewish woman. Of course my son and his fiancee would like to have some of the Jewish traditions at their wedding ie. the breaking of the glass, a Chupah, and a Ketubah. Yet she is refusing to have a Rabbi officiate because she is Catholic and no one from the Catholic church will assist in marrying them. Hence, if she can’t have a Deacon or Priest, the her mother will not allow a Rabbi to have any part of the service. My so seems to think that they can purchase a Ketubah and go to a Rabbi later on and get them to sign it. I personally think this is bizarre. What do you know about this. Can you help me?

    Thank you, Naomi Freedman

Real Weddings | Malibu, CA

Tali and Moshe are a stylish and well-traveled couple. They met in high-tech style (Thanks for another great match, JDate!), they got engaged in luxury (Moshe proposed during a Jamaican vacation, mon), and they enjoyed two wedding celebrations (one in Israel and one in Malibu). It’s no surprise that we are happy to feature their laid-back, casual, Tuesday afternoon wedding at the Malibu West Beach Club.

Today’s Real Weddings couple is made up of two people who know what they want in life. After all, Moshe was the first and only person Tali every contacted on JDate and she was a member for just three days! True love sometimes swoops in quickly. Tali and Moshe also had a dream team of wedding vendors who were involved in their Malibu wedding. Details were clearly planned and Jewish elements were woven in nicely. We love Moshe’s full-body participation in breaking the glass — he must have been really pumped to marry Tali because he jumped so high, it looks like he almost went through the chuppah. Airborne grooms make for great photo moments!

This is a wedding full of love, warmth, and ruach (spirit!) and we’re happy to see them celebrate a wonderful marriage for many, many years to come.

Mazel tov, Tali and Moshe!

Venue – Malibu West Beach Club
Rabbi – Rabbi Mendel Schwartz/Chai Center
Photographer – Henry Chen
Videographer – Kolkey Productions
Entertainment – DJ Eyal
Caterer – Balebosta Caterers
Makeup – Karen Scott Cosmetics
Hair – Chachi’s Hair Studio/Chess and Burman Salons
First Dance Choreography – Funky First Dance
Designer/Decor/Chuppah – CFS Design
Ketubah – 1-800-Ketubah
Photobooth – Cheesy Photobooth

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  • Reportage Photographer says:

    Nice happy couple! :)

  • Wendy says:

    Love the jump shot under the chuppah.

Yarmulke, o’ yarmulke!

Many of your non-Jewish guests may ask you about those little hats that men wear on their heads in temple. The Yentas offer you some answers that you can share.

  • The little hat is a yarmulke, also known as a kippah, which is a Yiddish word derived from the Polish word for “cap.” A yarmulke is worn during the time of prayer. So, that’s your very basic definition. But what does it have to do with weddings?
  • A yarmulke is one Jewish detail that you can tie in to your wedding color theme while providing the men who are attending your ceremony a wonderful take-home memento from your special day. Plus, we all know every household has a stash of collected yarmulkes ranging from special occasions like Joseph Abramovitz’s Bar Mitzvah (adorned with a printed pattern of baseballs and gloves), The Wedding of Beth and Aaron Cohen, and the plain white yarmulke your father-in-law accidentally wore home from the temple’s Rosh Hashanah morning service. This collection of yarmulkes you have in your china closet may just come in handy the next time you have Passover dinner at your house or your husband hosts a minyan.

But, we’re getting off track. Back to weddings, of course, and ideas that’ll make your guests want to keep your kippah.

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Yarmulkes come in all different colors and materials. We’ve seen yarmulkes made of satin, velvet, leather, suede, and yarn that’s knitted or crocheted. They can have a sports theme, an animal print, even your wedding logo. There is no yarmulke too sparkly or adorned! They can also be featured in your photos depending on their displays. Details on your wedding day are key, so let your yarmulke have a place in your album! Your bald Uncle Moshe will also be appreciative when his head doesn’t get burned during your beautiful outdoor ceremony! Who needs SPF 40 when you have a yarmulke?

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Providing yarmulkes at your wedding does not – we repeat, does not – have to be an additional stressful item. You can design and order online in a matter of minutes. A few of our favorite websites provide yarmulkes of every shape and color. Ordering online is an easy way to mix and match, buy in bulk, and get great deals on yarmulkes for your wedding!

  • Yussel’s Place: Ever heard of an eco-friendly yarmulke? Yussel’s Place carries them! Made of recycled cardboard, this is, without a doubt, the perfect addition to any green or eco-friendly wedding! They have a great variety of other yarmulkes as well that can all be ordered in bulk!
  • Yarmulkes.com: These guys have been in business for over 50 years. They can accommodate rush orders and have an amazing variety. Their prices are pretty good too!
  • Mazeltops.com: Not only does this site have a great name, their selection is outstanding! They have embossed foil yarmulkes with a paisley pattern (yup, paisley). How could you go wrong? For the creative, unique and maybe even wacky wedding theme, this is a site you would be silly not to check out.

Displaying your yarmulkes at your wedding can also be a creative project and detail element.

  • Find a cute chest, basket, or box to put the yarmulkes in, and as guests enter your ceremony area they can pick them up.
  • Line the card or gift table with yarmulkes.
  • Appoint someone to pass them out as guests are seated prior to your ceremony. A yarmulke and a program – what a deal! Better than popcorn and peanuts at a ballgame.

There are lots of ways to incorporate yarmulkes on your wedding day!

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Don’t forget…your groom can sport his own special yarmulke and give his groomsmen fun ones to wear. Can we say groomsmen gift? It’s just so simple!

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  • Elena says:

    I love this article! Yarmulkes are a great design element to include on your wedding day. I have used Mazeltops.com and they are a really great company.

  • Rachel says:

    I love the different yarmulkes at different weddings! For mine, I wanted to go traditional and customize ones that had our names, the date and location of our wedding written inside. We ordered them and then, once we got to our wedding location (Hawaii), my dad found awesome Hawaiian print yarmulkes at a local Chabad for FREE (of course he made a nice little donation too) that ended up being a huge hit with the wedding attendees! It was nice to have special yarmulkes for our special day.

  • Justine David says:

    Your article is short and sweet. I think it is about respect for the tradition and formality of the event. Just another aspect of the wedding where one can utilize creativity and individuality.
    Just another reason to check your posts daily!

    Love it!

  • Lauren says:

    Good advice! I love looking back on all the old yarmulkes from past weddings – brings back memories from those events.

  • Araxi says:

    Love this! Im not Jewish and it wasn’t til recently that I realized that you can customize the yarmulke for different events. I love some of the ideas of incorporating tradition in a modern way. Well done! :)